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07/11/2011

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Rob

Hi Joe,
For the training peaks software what exactly does an athlete need as far as equipment, ie power meter etc., in order to make it worth while to use the system?
Thanks,
Rob

Joe Friel

Rob--For WKO+ software (resides on your computer) you need a power meter (bike) or GPS (run). HR is optional. To use the same features/functions on line at TrainingPeaks.com any one of these will do it. In other words, HR-based PMC is not available with WKO+.

Nathaniel

Hi Joe,
How do you show the CP.1, CP6, and CP30 on the performance chart?

Joe Friel

Nathaniel - On your PMC open OPTIONS (upper right corner)... CUSTOM CHART... DETAILS. Set CONTENT to MEAN MAXIMAL, CHANNEL to POWER, DURATION to 6 MINUTES (or 1 or 30 or whatever), UNITS to WATTS, SHOW BESTS to 10, COLOR whatever you want, FORMAT to LINE, SYMBOL to SQUARE, LINE STYLE THIN, SPORT FILTER ANY. Click OK and you've got it. There's one little glitch in WKO: If you do all of the above in zoomed mode the changes will only take in zoomed mode. A little thing that frustrates many users I've found.

matthew emeott

Hey Joe_
i understand from some of your previous posts that when peaking you don't want CTL to drop too quickly (i believe 10% was the target) but why would it matter if your TSB raises too quickly? or was is this basically another way of saying he'd be over the 10% drop in CTL? finally, why +20....i'm just curious if that number is a percentage increase from TSB when he started the peak or is it a number you arrived at simply through experience with this particular athlete?
thanks for a great blog/resource_
matt

Madeleine

Hi Joe,

In ideal world training, what TSB would you like to see in the Transition period?

Was December a Preparation Block? Or another transition?

Thanks,
Madeleine

Ronan

Hi Joe,
How is fatigue measured in training peaks?

regards,

Ronan.

Joe Friel

Ronan--_Everything_ in WKO is based on either power or pace. If you don't use either then I'm sure you won't understand. Athletes seldom do until they start using it. If you really want to understand all of this stuff read Allen's and Coggan's book, training and racing with a Power Meter.

Joe Friel

Madeleine - I'd prefer my athletes didn't look at TSB in transition. We started base/accumulation training in November and it extended into December and beyond. Scheduled surgery where the big fitness down turn occurs shortly thereafter.

Joe Friel

matthew emeott - a rapid increase in TSB accompanies a rapid decrease in fitness. I've found about +20 TSB works pretty well for most athletes who have high CTLs.

Madeleine

Hmm. Maybe I should have put my question in a different way.

As I understand it, WKO is a useful tool in quantifying work for the purposes of plotting the trajectory to a performance peak. The ATL and CTL equations are all built upon experimental models of the rates of RISE of fitness and fatigue, but there is nothing to say that they also accurately reflect the rate of regeneration.

By your answer are you saying that you do not find TSB to have predictive power in determining whether your athlete is on the way to deep regeneration? Or do you mean that TSB might be useful in this way, but that ignoring the numbers for a while is part of letting go of the training mindset?

Just curious - there is a lot I have yet to learn about WKO !
Thanks,
Madeleine

Bryan

Hi Joe,
is the WKO/ training peaks software a useful tool for marathon runners who use a GPS and heart rate monitor or is it primarily for multi-sport athletes?

Self-coached Friel Disciple

What happened with this athlete towards the end of May this year? It looks like the athlete backed off of their training load as the CTL started to decline for several weeks prior to the end of June, when it picked up again prior to July peak. Was this by design or was there an external influence on the training load?

Joe Friel

Self-coached--I think you must mean December. Scheduled surgery.

Joe Friel

Bryan--Yes, works great for distance runners, trail runners, road cyclists, mountain bikers, XC skiers, triathletes and duathletes. Any endurance sport that can use a GPS, HR monitor, power meter or accelerometer.

Joe Friel

Madeleine - The transition period is meant to be a time of rejuvenation. To me that means no "training." Watching TSB means one is training.

Self-coached Friel Disciple

Joe, I did indeed mean May, not December. It is the area below your purple paragraph. It seems that the athlete's CTL peaked at the end of May. It looks like they did a lot of work in May, there is a big "mountain" of ATL, then they lay off ATL as form goes higher in June, then drops again until just prior to the end of the graph. Shouldn't ATL make a continuous progression throughout the season(by designing workouts that continue to challenge the athlete), only to fall down a bit during rest weeks and a bit more when tapering for an A race? Thanks.

Joe Friel

Self-coached--He was peaking for another race then.

Miles

Joe -
What is the most important CP value to track and monitor as a long course triathlete. I conduct regular FTP test per you protocol and that give me an estimate FTP (CP60) so is that what I want to track?
Thanks,
MM

Joe Friel

Miles--I keep close tabs primarily on FTP for all of the athletes I coach.

Chris

Hi Joe. In a previous post about peaking you recommend to do workouts with 3-5x90seconds race pace intervals in the race week (for example: 4 hours mtb-race on saturday, then doing tuesday 5x90sec, wedn. 4x90sec., thurs. easy 1hours and friday 3x90sec.). I am sure this is a very good race preparation, but is it not also important to empty the glycogen stores on tuesday (in this case) and after this eat carbohydrates to fuel the glycogen stores in the muscles very good? For empty the stores i need a longer zone1/2-ride about 2-3 hours which produce also fatigue - a conflict.... what do you think about this? Chris

Joe Friel

Chris--Not a good idea to create a lot of deep fatigue that week, which is what depleting glycogen would do. If you've been training steadily and back of the last week before the race even more you will fill your glycogen stores quite nicely.

Chris

Ok-thanks for information. So you mean the above described workouts which take a duration about 1 hour (with cool down and warm up) are enough? I did a tune-up race with 2 hours on Saturday (i am sure that this deplet the glycogen *g*), so it would be the best to do two days off or easy (sunday & monday) and than start with the short-interval-workouts.

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